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Energy system analytics and good governance

U4RIA goals of Energy Modelling for Policy Support

Energy modelling is the process of using mathematical models to develop abstractions and then seek insights into future energy systems. It can be an abstract academic activity. Or, it can insert threads that influence our development. We argue therefore, that energy modelling that provides policy support (EMoPS) should not only be grounded in rigorous analytics, but also in good governance principles. As, together with other policy actions, it should be accountable.

Almost all aspects of society and much of its impact on the environment are influenced by our use of energy. In this context, EMoPS can inspire, motivate, calibrate, and ‘post assess’ energy policy. But, such modeling is often undertaken by too few analysts under time and resource pressure. Building on the advances of ‘class leaders’, we propose that EMoPS should reach for practical goals — including engagement and accountability with the communities it involves, and those it will later affect. (We use the term Ubuntu, meaning ‘I am because you are’ to capture this interdependency). We argue that Ubuntu, together with retrievability, reusability repeatability, reconstructability, interoperability and auditability (U4RIA) of EMoPS should be used to signal the beginnings of a new default practice. We demonstrate how the U4RIA principles can contribute in practice using recent modelling of aspirational energy futures by Costa Rica as a case study. This modelling effort includes community involvement and interfaces and integrates stakeholder involvement. It leaves a trail that allows for its auditing and accountability, while building capacity and sustainable institutional memory.

Photo Credit: Enrique Vidal Flores/Unsplash

Contributing partners

  • Adrian Tompkins– International Center for Theoretical Physics
  • Adrien Vogt-Schilb– Inter American Development Bank
  • Andrea Meza– Climate Change Directorate, Ministry of Environment and Energy, Government of Costa Rica.
  • Andrii Gritsevskyi– International Atomic Energy Agency
  • Asami Miketa– International Renewable Energy Agency
  • Ashish Shrestha– Energy Sector Management Assistance Program, World Bank Group
  • Benjamin Stewart– Energy Sector Management Assistance Program, World Bank Group
  • Chris Bataille– Institute for Sustainable Development and International Relations
  • Constantinos Taliotis– The Cyprus Institute
  • Dana Rysankova– Energy Sector Management Assistance Program, World Bank Group
  • Daniel Russo– International Renewable Energy Agency
  • Estathios Peteves– Joint Research Centre, European Commission
  • Eunice Ramos– Royal Institute of Technology (KTH)
  • Felipe de Leon– Climate Change Directorate, Ministry of Environment and Energy, Government of Costa Rica
  • Francesco Gardumi– Royal Institute of Technology (KTH)
  • Franziska Bock– Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)
  • George Partasides– Ministry of Energy, Commerce and Industry of the Republic of Cyprus
  • Guido Godínez– University of Costa Rica
  • Henri Waisman– Institute for Sustainable Development and International Relations
  • Holger Rogner– International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis
  • Jairo Quiros-Tortos– University of Costa Rica
  • Jam Angulo– University of Costa Rica
  • Luca Petrarulo– Oxford Policy Management
  • Ludwig Hülk– Reiner Lemoine Institut
  • Luis F. Victor– University of Costa Rica
  • Mario Tot– International Atomic Energy Agency
  • Mark Howells– Imperial College London and Loughborough University
  • Morgan Bazilian– Payne Institute, Colorado School of Mines
  • Nicolina Lindblad– Energy Sector Management Assistance Program, World Bank Group
  • Pablo Carvajal– International Renewable Energy Agency
  • Patrick Van-Hove– Directorate-General for Research and Innovation, European Commission
  • Robbie Morrison
  • Taco Niet– Simon Fraser University
  • Thomas Alfstad– United Nations Division of Economic and Social Affairs
  • William Blyth– Oxford Energy Associates
  • Will Usher– Royal Institute of Technology (KTH)